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Build Confidence & Skating Numbers with Rollerblade’s Macroblade ABT

Rollerblade's ABT

Click To Start Rollerblade ABT Video

In my 20+ years teaching skating, I have taught 1000’s of people how to skate or how to skate better.

When meeting new skaters, or listening to the reasons why a relatively experienced skater is hesitant to skate more often, I have noticed a common theme:

Lack of Confidence:  People want to feel more confident while on their skates.

Being able to control your speed and stop in a variety of settings and various surfaces is the basis of a safe and enjoyable skating experience. It is the foundation of what keeps people skating.   Being able to skate when I want, and wherever I want is what motivates ME to skate.

The Macroblade ABT is perfect for the skater that needs a little confidence booster.  The Active Brake Technology allows the skater to have all 8 wheels on the skating surface, which provides the stability and control that they are looking for in their skating experience.

Personally having skated in the Macroblade 80 ABT (Pictured below) since Rollerblade’s International Sales Meeting last year. I have found that the brake does not get in the way of my skating at all, which is a common concern for some skaters, and have been able turn and maneuver in variety of situations with ease. It truly feels like an extension of my foot.

Women's Macroblade 80 ABT

2017 Women’s Macroblade 80 ABT

 

For those new to the sport, the ABT is the perfect tool to speed up their learning curve giving them the confidence and motivation to skate more often and for longer periods of time.

This is something that I believe we can all agree upon is important for the growth of our sport:

More people skating confidently, More people skating for longer periods of time. More people skating.  PERIOD.

For additional information about the Macroblade ABT, skating videos, skating advice and more check out www.rollerblade.com

 

Men's Macroblade 80 ABT

2017 Men’s Macroblade 80 ABT

 
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Be the Witness to Change

Published on January 10, 2017 by in Uncategorized

Change Chinese Characher

This is the time of the year for “grand proclamations” of change.

The reality, however, is that there is no need to wait until the New Year. While is does provide a somewhat ceremonious starting point, we can make a change in every moment, every second of our lives.  The opportunity to change the way we think, speak and act lies in our ability to be the “witness”, the “observer”.  The “witness” is the part of us that “knows we know”. It is awareness and our best teacher. It is the ability to “watch” our actions, reactions and  personality manifest in relation to the world around us.

Examples of opportunities to develop the “witness”:

  • When saying “I told you so” to a loved one or friend when they didn’t follow our advice, is replaced by either a heart felt condolence or by saying nothing at all.
  • Noticing the space between hearing the voice inside remind us that we do not “need” that 3rd piece of pizza, no matter how tasty, and NOT taking that third piece.
  • It is the ability to let go of a repetitive, unserving thought that causes depression or anxiety, and choosing to replace it with one that is neutral or maybe even joyful.
  • Being “cut off” by a car on a highway and instead of condemning the driver, bless them and wish for their safe arrival wherever they may be going.

Change Sign

 

Changing patterns of thoughts and behavior through developing the ability to witness takes vigilance and continual practice.   According to the teachings of Swami Satyananda in the Bihar School of Yoga, it is believed that one of the best ways to develop the ability to “witness” is through Karma Yoga.  In  ”Yoga Vision” on the Bihar School of Yoga website, Karma Yoga is referred to as  ”a system which develops immunity to the reactive and negative components of an action. “Swami Niranjanananda has said  that “Through karma yoga we are able to understand our own life, improve the quality of life and transcend life.”

Karma Yoga is the yoga of action and is often referred to as “selfless service.”  While all work we do, and actions that we perform, can potentially be labeled as Karma Yoga, it is easiest to begin with duties in which we literally and figuratively have little or no attachment.  Karma Yoga  is then working without worrying about the “fruits of the labor” or even completing the task.  In Karma Yoga it is actually okay “not” to finish what you are working and to allow your effort and whatever outcome or consequences to be “good enough.”  The idea is to notice the thoughts, etc. that arise before, during or after the experience.

Karma Yoga provides a wonderful platform to change hard-wired patterns of thoughts and behaviors, positively altering our personality, relationships and lives over a period of time.  So if you have made your grand proclamation for change in 2017 don’t forget to leave space for the “witness”.  In the words of Michael Jackson:

“If You Wanna Make The World
A Better Place
Take A Look At Yourself, And
Then Make A Change”

~Man in the Mirror

 

seasons_people_change_autumn

 

 
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Depression and Anxiety Decline after Participation in a Semester Long Yoga Class

Breath Awareness in Crocodile

The following was published August 30th, 2016 in the Psychology and Education Journal.

Depression and Anxiety Decline after Participation in a Semester Long Yoga Class

Jeremy E. C. Genovese & Kristine Fondran

Cleveland State University

      Students at large Midwestern University completed the short form of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS 21) at the beginning and end of a semester long yoga class. The class was taught by an experienced yoga instructor and included physical postures (asana), breathing practice (pranayama), and meditation (including yoga nidra). The classes met twice a week over a 16 week semester and each class lasted for 50 minutes. The participants showed statistically significant declines in depression, and anxiety. Stress also decreased, but the results were not statistically significant.

 

We originally intended this study as a comparative test of the effects of yoga practice on depression, anxiety, and stress. We had hoped to compare students in yoga classes with wait list controls and other, non-yoga, exercise classes. Unfortunately, we only received one response from the course wait list and only eight responses from students in non-yoga exercise classes. Fully recognizing the limitations of the remaining data, we felt these exploratory results were sufficiently interesting to report to the research community. It is our hope that these findings will encourage others to study the psychological benefits of yoga.

Methods

Participants

Sixty one students, enrolled in three sections of an elective yoga class offered by a large urban university, participated in this study. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 67. Fifty of the participants were female and eleven were male. In this sample, 47 participants identified as White, 5 as Hispanic or Latino, 4 as Black or African American, 3 as Asian or Asian American 1 as Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and 1 as American Indian or Alaska Native. Thirty one of the participants had no previous yoga experience, 4 did not respond to the question, while 26 had yoga experience ranging from 6 months to 12 years.

Instrument

Students were asked to provide demographic information and to complete the short form of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS 21) on the first day of class, prior to any instruction, and again during the last week of class. The DASS 21 is a widely used 21 item self-report instrument that measures depression, anxiety, and stress. The DASS 21 has shown good psychometric properties and can be used for both clinical and non-clinical populations (Antony, et al., 1998). The DASS 21 asks participants to reference their answers to the previous week, thus, it is useful for tracking change over time.

Class

All yoga classes were taught by the same experienced teacher, trained in the Bihar School of yoga. The yoga classes included physical postures (asana), breathing practice (pranayama), and meditation (including yoga nidra). The classes met twice a week over a 16 week semester and each class lasted for 50 minutes. Students were encouraged to practice outside of class.

Analysis                                                                                     

The data were analyzed using Simstat. Because of the limitations of the data, we chose to use a more conservative nonparametric approach. Pre-class and post-class scores on the three scales of the DASS 21 were compared using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed test.

Results

Levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, as measured by the DASS 21, fell after one semester of yoga, however only two of these declines (depression and anxiety) were statistically significant (see Table 1).

Table 1.

Summary of Reported Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Before and After a 16 Week Yoga Class

 

Before Yoga Class

After Yoga Class

Variable

Mean

SD

α

Mean

SD

α

p

Depression

2.77

3.17

.84

1.30

1.50

.64

.00

Anxiety

4.07

4.21

.47

2.55

2.91

.75

.02

Stress

6.17

4.48

.85

4.73

3.89

.84

.08

Note: α = Cronbach’s α. Wilcoxon matched-pairs test.

Discussion

The results reported here are limited because of the lack of a control group. The declines in depression, anxiety, and stress might be explained by some factor other than yoga. However, for university students, depression, anxiety, and stress are known to increase over the course of semester (Andrews, & Wilding, 2004; Jemmott, & Magloire, 1988), and it is noteworthy that participants in this study experienced decreases. At minimum, these results suggest that yoga is promising area for future research.

 

 

References

Andrews, B., & Wilding, J. M. (2004). The relation of depression and anxiety to life‐stress and achievement in students. British Journal of Psychology, 95(4), 509-521.

Antony, M. M., Bieling, P. J., Cox, B. J., Enns, M. W., & Swinson, R. P. (1998). Psychometric properties of the 42-item and 21-item versions of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in clinical groups and a community sample. Psychological assessment, 10(2), 176 -181.

Jemmott, J. B., & Magloire, K. (1988). Academic stress, social support, and secretory immunoglobulin A. Journal of personality and social psychology, 55(5), 803 – 810.

Author Note: 

Jeremy E.C. Genovese is Associated Professor of Human Development, Department of Curriculum and Foundations, College of Education and Human Services, Cleveland State University.

Kristine M. Fondran is a part-time lecturer, Department of Health and Human Performance, College of Education and Human Services, Cleveland State University.

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Jeremy Genovese, JH 367, Department of Curriculum and Foundations, Cleveland State University, College of Education and Human Services, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, 44122.

Email: j.genovese@csuohio.edu

Yoga Nidra-Just about everyone's favorite!

 

 
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